Performers, prostitutes and pints: Camden’s on the map

AN ARTIST has drawn up an unusual map of Camden for his latest exhibition – complete with signs for drug dealers, Dick Turpin, wannabe rock stars and ladies of the night

Katie Davies

AN ARTIST has drawn up an unusual map of Camden for his latest exhibition - complete with signs for drug dealers, Dick Turpin, wannabe rock stars and ladies of the night.

Stephen Walter is hosting an exhibition of his unique maps of London in King's Cross.

The 32-year-old's work incorporates the capital's boroughs drawn in pencil with unusual signs and symbols summing up elements of the area.


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Camden is, of course, littered with pictures of pints and names of the famous musicians and actors like Sadie Frost and Ewan McGregor who have lived here, as well as symbols of the seedier parts, and tributes to historic figures such as the famous Highwayman who have passed through.

"I was born and bred in London, and places like Camden I have been visiting from a young age," said Mr Walter.

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"I did bars and clubs and signs saying, 'Anyone want some ganja?' because these are the little quirks of Camden.

"As an artist I have always been interested in signs and symbols, and this is about the local stereotypes and reputations of an area. But they are intended to be acidic as well as to raise a smile."

Other boroughs have also come under the scrutiny of Mr Walter, with Westminster, Haringey and Barnet also having good as well as bad thrown on to their respective maps.

"The feedback has been really positive and the pieces show the diversity of London as a whole," added Mr Walter.

"The good thing is that it is something we can relate to ourselves. Anyone living anywhere in London can look up where they live."

To cover the whole of the capital, Mr Walker had to research areas not as well known as the key spots in the West End.

"I had to do a lot of work on smaller areas I'd never heard of," he said. "I used maps and books on London, and things like Wikipedia were useful as well as newspaper facts. There was a lot of research. I was only going to do it for three months but it ended up taking me a year and a half. Eventually you just run out of space."

The exhibition, which is entitled The Island: London Series, is on show at The Crypt in St Pancras Church from now until March 2. The Crypt is open daily from 11am until 6pm.

katie.davies@hamhigh.co.uk

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