Love affair with Fanny Brawne to be played out at Keats House

Keats House in Hampstead will once again be brought to life this summer in a brand-new drama production about the life of its most famous residents: John Keats and his lover Fanny Brawne. Adapted from John Keats s letters and poetry by James Veitch, Keats

Keats House in Hampstead will once again be brought to life this summer in a brand-new drama production about the life of its most famous residents: John Keats and his lover Fanny Brawne.

Adapted from John Keats's letters and poetry by James Veitch, Keats in Hampstead will provide a platform to appreciate the man, his work, his legacy and his loves.

Pale Fire Productions evolves the theatrical experience; encouraging its audience to experience, with Keats, a 'life of sensations' on the very lawn where he once heard a nightingale's song and composed what is, perhaps, the most beautiful poem ever written.

This summer the audience is asked to renounce the plush velvet seats and darkened, sterile theatre in favour of the shade of a Keatsean Mulberry tree, a Hampstead breeze and, potentially, a few cucumber sandwiches.


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Keats in Hampstead brings to life Keats and Fanny Brawne in their own words on their own lawn. The audience is encouraged to bring a picnic.

The letters Keats wrote to Brawne over the course of their relationship are some of the most most famous (and sauciest) love letters ever written. Discovered following Brawne's death in 1865, Keats' love letters caused a furor among critics and admirers who were shocked at their candor.

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The letters have been described as, "at times manipulative and deliberately cruel.'" Now, however, they are justly regarded as among the most beautiful letters ever written

The spring of 1819 was an exceedingly prolific period of Keats's short life, catalysed by his burgeoning romance with Fanny Brawne, the original, girl next door. Charles Brown describes the genesis of Ode to a Nightingale,

''In the spring of 1819 a nightingale had built her nest near my house. One morning Keats took his chair from the breakfast table to the grass plot under a plum-tree where he sat for two to three hours. When he came into the house, I perceived he had some scraps of paper in his hand and these he was quietly thrusting behind some books.''

Ticket price includes admission to the Keats House museum which the audience are encouraged to visit before or following the performance. Inside the house visitors can see for themselves Keats's study, bedroom and various treasures including the ring given to Brawne by her lover.

James Veitch returns to London after a successful run of Room 103, Hotel Chelsea in New York.

As writer and director of this world premiere production, Hotel Chelsea was performed inside the famous hotel located on 222 West 23rd Street and Room 103 explored the history of one of New York City's most famous artistic havens.

With his ensemble of actors, Mr. Veitch examined tales of Dylan Thomas's alcoholic demise, Sid Vicious' killing of Nancy Spungen, and residents

like Bob Dylan and Jack Kerouac, bringing to life the private and pivotal moments of revolutionary artists as they happened within the walls of this notorious establishment.

Surrounded by Hotel Chelsea's magnificent d�cor and by transforming Chelsea's actual room 103 into an intimate performance space, the audience was led on a journey where history meets memory and the lines of fiction and reality were blurred.

Critics declared Mr. Veitch to be a "brainy, intense young actor/director...who exudes determination and intelligence" (The Vancouver Courier) and an artist "ahead of the poetic curve" (The Guardian).

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