'Great to share the ups and downs with everyone': Camden's Euro 2020 final

Foyezur Miah, Cllr Georgia Gould and Cllr Nash Ali

Foyezur Miah, Cllr Georgia Gould and Cllr Nash Ali at the Dome in Queen's Crescent watching England - Credit: QCCA

Though England didn't win Euro 2020 on Sunday night, watching the football brought the Camden community together – and the Italians who call Hampstead home were, of course, celebrating. 

In Gospel Oak, the Queen's Crescent Community Association (QCCA) and the King's Cross Brunswick Neighbourhood Association (KCBNA) used the former's Dome venue to host a family-friendly watching party for the final. 

And in the aftermath of the game, local figures have joined calls for stricter punishments for those racially abusing players. 

A rapt crowd of football fans at the Queen's Crescent Community Association

A rapt crowd of football fans at the Queen's Crescent Community Association - Credit: QCCA

Hanging the bunting in Queen's Crescent before the Dome played host to a Euro 2020 final screening

Hanging the bunting in Queen's Crescent before the Dome played host to a Euro 2020 final screening - Credit: QCCA

Organised by council leader Georgia Gould, Foyezur Miah from QCCA and Cllr Nash Ali from KCBNA, the idea was to make sure an inclusive space was on offer for people who wanted to watch the game together as a community. Notably, it was alcohol free.

Foyezur said: "‘We all got very excited at the result and in the heat of the moment decided we wanted to find a way to make sure everyone felt involved, especially marginalised communities and Moslem families who don’t drink.

"‘We knew that many people who live round here wouldn’t feel comfortable in crowded pubs and restaurants but we didn’t want them to feel their only choice was to watch the match at home. So we decided to open up the Dome."

England fans and Camden councillors Nash Ali and Georgia Gould

England fans and Camden councillors Nash Ali and Georgia Gould - Credit: QCCA


You may also want to watch:


Foyezur said there was an "amazing turnout", continuing: "We didn’t get the result we wanted, but it was great to share the ups and downs of the evening with everyone."

Football fans at the Carlton Tavern as the tension began to get too much

Football fans at the Carlton Tavern as the tension began to get too much - Credit: Carlton Tavern

When England scored early, fans at the Carltn Tavern thought Euro 2020 might just be 'coming home'.

When England scored early, fans at the Carlton Tavern thought Euro 2020 might just be 'coming home'. - Credit: Carlton Tavern

At the Carlton Tavern in Maida Vale, the pub's Tom Rees said the game went well, aside from the result. He said there were "some tired and emotional souls" by the time the last penalties were taken.

Most Read

The result went down slightly better at Belsize Village restaurant Calici – where some of NW3's Italy fans congregated. 

Emotions ran high at the Carlton Tavern in Maida Vale during England's Euro 2020 final against Italy

Emotions ran high at the Carlton Tavern in Maida Vale during England's Euro 2020 final against Italy - Credit: Carlton Tavern

Richard Lagani – an Italian-American who has been involved in the Belsize Village Business Association – said: "It was amazing, so much fun." 

Richard, whose grandparents hailed from the southern Italian region of Calabria, added: "It was great, the Italians know how to party, though the whole game was incredibly tense after England scored...

"We all live here and love it, but the loyalty is always to Italy when it comes to football at least."

A predominantly Italian crowd at Calici in Belsize Village during the Euro 2020 final

A predominantly Italian crowd at Calici in Belsize Village during the Euro 2020 final - Credit: Belsize Village Business Association

Another Hampsteadite, environmental campaigner Valeria Pensabene, who was among those nervous ahead of the game, said: "[It was] a bit marred by the violence in London and around the UK but I thought it was an excellent match with a very good England, balanced refereeing and just generally good football. 

"Penalties are always disappointing, but again, I thought the Italian comeback was worthy of the win." 

There were a handful of England fans watching with the Italian supporters at Calici in Belsize

There were a handful of England fans watching with the Italian supporters at Calici in Belsize - Credit: Belsize Village Business Association

But as instances of racist abuse began to pile-up in the aftermath of the match – aimed primarily at the three young players Bukayo Saka, Marcus Rashford and Jadon Sancho who were unlucky to miss penalties – politicians backed calls for abuse to be driven out of football. 

Sir Keir Starmer, who watched the game at the Grafton Arms in Kentish Town, tweeted afterwards: "The entire England team have brought us together and given us memories that will last a life time. They represent the best of us.

"Anyone racially abusing them is a disgrace and doesn’t represent us at all. More can and must be done to stop online abuse."

England's Kalvin Phillips, left, and Luke Shaw, right, comfort teammate Bukayo Saka after he failed

Bukayo Sako is consoled by his England team-mates after his penalty miss. - Credit: AP

His parliamentary colleagues Dawn Butler and Tulip Siddiq were both at Wembley, supporting local players – most prominently Brent's Raheem Sterling.

Tulip said the England team symbolised unity, adding: "There will always be those who try to divide us - who question loyalties and stoke hate – but this feeling of unity overcoming differences which we have witnessed as a nation over the Euros should be celebrated."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter