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Six Camden and Haringey home extensions shortlisted for awards

PUBLISHED: 18:42 21 December 2016 | UPDATED: 15:26 22 December 2016

12 Pages Lane by Kirkwood McCarthy. Photographs by David Butler

12 Pages Lane by Kirkwood McCarthy. Photographs by David Butler

David Butler

These extensions and home improvements in Highgate, Tufnell Park, Queen's Park, Muswell Hill, and Hornsey have been shortlisted for the NLA Improve, Don't Move! 2017 awards.

Valhalla, Highgate, Denizen Works, Photo Credit: Ben BlossomValhalla, Highgate, Denizen Works, Photo Credit: Ben Blossom

Six homes in north London have been shortlisted for the prestigious Improve, Don’t Move! 2017 awards.

Every year New London Architects pick the very best of London’s extensions and home improvement projects, recognising projects where clients and architects have improvised ingenious ways to re imagine an existing building.

Peter Murray, Chairman of New London Architecture and said:

“As London continues to grow we need to make the best use of land in the capital. Home extensions provide an increase in accommodation that is sympathetic to the surrounding neighbourhood, improve the quality of space of older houses and increase their energy performance.”

Home/Studio Kilburn Lane, Queen�s Park, by Studio McLeodHome/Studio Kilburn Lane, Queen�s Park, by Studio McLeod

This will be the seventh year the awards have been held and it was record breaking one, with 120 entries in the long list whittled down to 24.

With transaction levels at an all time low in Hampstead and Highgate, homeowners are increasingly exploring their options fro staying put with the help of some carefully thought out home improvements.

Why not find some inspiration for your extension (and some architect recommendations) with these six local shortlisted projects:

Clay House, Tufnell Park, by Simon Astridge Architecture WorkshopClay House, Tufnell Park, by Simon Astridge Architecture Workshop

Clay House, Tufnell Park, by Simon Astridge Architecture Workshop

This one bedroom Tufnell Park flat has been “conceived as a series of verbs and actions that occur within the spaces” by Simon Astridge Architecture Workshop.

The Workshop – which eschews all forms of social media – prides themselves on innovative and high specification architectural solutions, specialising in model making to help clients better conceive of the their proposed designs.

simonastridge.com

Harvey Road, Hornsey, by Erbar MattesHarvey Road, Hornsey, by Erbar Mattes

Harvey Road, Hornsey, by Erbar Mattes

This early 20th century mid terrace home in Crouch End has been given a new lease of life with a limewashed brick and glass extension.

Architecture studio Erbar Mattes increased the ground floor living space for the family of four living at the address by adding a kitchen, drawing room and garden room at the rear.

By reversing the layout of the previously front loaded design the family can now take full advantage of the afternoon light.

Harvey Road, Hornsey, by Erbar MattesHarvey Road, Hornsey, by Erbar Mattes

A wall of bi-folding, oak framed glazing with a deep, plushly upholstered seat inset replaced an old bay window, connecting the interior rooms to the garden and creating a comfortable spot for the family to sit with their two young children.

erbarmattes.com

Home/Studio Kilburn Lane, Queen’s Park, by Studio McLeod

Home/Studio Kilburn Lane, Queen�s Park, by Studio McLeodHome/Studio Kilburn Lane, Queen�s Park, by Studio McLeod

This innovative live/work space was originally just the Director of Studio McLeod’s house.

Duncan and Linsay McLeod have created their dream home with an incomparable work life balance (and enviable London commute) by developing a studio at the rear of their property.

Spaces are connected but separate, with cleverly positioned glazing allowing for sneak peeks into the studio and a connection to the outside spaces.

The curved side walls curve up to glazing, which has been inlaid with gold formica and as the light changes throughout the day the colour changes from yellow to blue.

Home/Studio Kilburn Lane, Queen’s Park, by Studio McLeodHome/Studio Kilburn Lane, Queen’s Park, by Studio McLeod

studiomcleod.com

Pages Lane, Muswell Hill, by Kirkwood McCarthy

A semi-detached Victorian home in Muswell Hill has been turned into a spacious family home with a new ground floor wing, clad in striking black zinc.

12 Pages Lane by Kirkwood McCarthy. Photographs by David Butler12 Pages Lane by Kirkwood McCarthy. Photographs by David Butler

A sunny courtyard space has been created, linking the new rooms and the garden in a naturally flowing sequence.

The ceiling stretches up to 3.3 mt, exaggerating the sense of space, and the asymmetric roof was designed to preserve the Mountain Ash trees already in situ and the view from the first floor windows.

kirkwoodmccarthy.com

12 Pages Lane by Kirkwood McCarthy. Photographs by David Butler12 Pages Lane by Kirkwood McCarthy. Photographs by David Butler

Lacy Brick, Hornsey, by Pamphilon Architects

Pamphilon Architects created this funky textured brick wall for the extension of this Harrinagy home owned by a fashion designer.

The existing Edwardian end of terrace had a slightly wonky internal layout, thanks to an adjoining road, leaving the kitchen a little cramped.

The compact extension has enlarged the kitchen space, and whilst the brick façade is in keeping with the rest of the terrace it provides a tantalising twist on the theme.

Lacy Brick, Hornsey, by Pamphilon Architects. Photo credit: Vicky Bamforth Lacy Brick, Hornsey, by Pamphilon Architects. Photo credit: Vicky Bamforth

Inside, the timber frame and ceiling beams have been left exposed, whilst the monochrome patterned floor and acid yellow cabinets add to the irreverent atmosphere.

pamphilonarchitects.com

Valhalla, Highgate, by Denizen Works

Valhalla, Highgate, Denizen Works, Photo Credit: Ben BlossomValhalla, Highgate, Denizen Works, Photo Credit: Ben Blossom

We already knew this Highgate project was something special when we featured it back in September.

The tired façade of this home near Highgate cemetery was shown up by its award winning neighbours, so Denizen Works took up the challenge of giving the home a face lift without encroaching on the street.

The resulting fins of traumatised larch contrasts with the white underside and creates a spooky effect as the viewer passes by different perspectives.

With all its deathly connections the project was fittingly christened for the Norse hall of the dead, Valhalla.

denizenworks.com

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