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East Finchley: Home to some of London’s most expensive roads

PUBLISHED: 17:06 13 November 2014 | UPDATED: 10:24 17 November 2014

Archer statue by Eric Aumonier at East Finchley Station

Archer statue by Eric Aumonier at East Finchley Station

Londoneye

The bohemian area is a green oasis tucked away from the bustle of Central London, where sprawling mansions mingle with leafy parks and charming pubs. Home to some of the most expensive streets in London, the lure of East Finchley has brought in a crowd ranging from property magnates to theatre legends.

Phoenix cinema in East Finchley, Britain's oldest continuously working cinemaPhoenix cinema in East Finchley, Britain's oldest continuously working cinema

Local Authority

East Finchley is an area in the London Borough of Barnet. Geographically it is somewhat separate from the rest of Finchley, with North Finchley and West Finchley to the north, and Finchley Central to the west.

Council Tax Bands

The total council tax bill which the smallest properties in Band A would expect to pay is £934.04. Properties in the average Band D should receive a bill of £1,401.07. The most expensive homes in Band H would receive a Council Tax bill of 2,802.14.

Property

The average price of a two bedroom flat is £389,646, a semi-detached home is £1,241,908 and a detached home costs £3,468,340.

Housing styles range from 19th century terraced housing and 1960s council estates to the multi-million pound mansions on ‘billionaire’s row,’ the Bishop’s Avenue favoured by Russian magnates and property moguls. The three 11-storey tower blocks of Prospect Ring, near to the centre of East Finchley, are visible for miles around.

Education

There are many primary schools including Martin Primary School and Kerem School, which is ranked as Outstanding by Ofsted.

Fortismere School and Treehouse School are stand out secondary schools, while the prestigious Highgate School lies nearby.

Transport

East Finchley tube station is in Zone 3 of the Underground, on the High Barnet branch of the Northern line. Central London is approximately 25 minutes away by Tube.

There are numerous buses running from East Finchley, including the 102 towards Brent Cross, Edmonton Green (24-hour service) or Golders Green (24-hour service), the 263 towards Barnet Hospital or Holloway and the 603 towards Muswell Hill or Swiss Cottage. The nightbus N20 runs towards Barnet or Trafalgar Square.

Landmarks and History

The land on which most of East Finchley now stands was once part of the Bishop of London’s hunting ground, named Finchley Common, first recorded around 1400.

The Bishop of London built a road through his land weaving through what is now Market Place, The Walks, King Street and Oak Lane up to the north.

East Finchley tube station is also marked by a well-known statue of an archer by Eric Aumonier in the Art Deco style. The archer is pointing his arrow towards the entrance to the tunnel which starts south of the station and runs for 17.3 miles to the end of the Northern line at Morden and for many years was the longest tunnel in the world.

Major Shopping Areas

The High Road has a good selection of shops, as well as a handful of gems, including Cherry Tree for gifts, Koko for shoes and Black Gull Books for charming second-hand titles.

Branches of Waitrose, Sainsbury’s and several high street chain stores can be found in nearby North Finchley.

Amenities

The area has a number of charming, character-filled family pubs. The Old White Lion is an ideal spot for relaxing after a walk on Hampstead Heath, boasting six real ales and a newly refurbished beer garden. On the High Road, The Bald-Faced Stag has a stylish interior and beer garden.

A good selection of small restaurants includes Genzo, Va Pensiero and, if you’re up for a mouth-watering (if somewhat pricey) curry, there’s Cochin Restaurant.

The Phoenix Cinema on the High Road is one of the oldest cinemas in the UK and plays a mix of new releases, foreign and independent films.

The leafy area also has a plethora of parks. Cherry Tree Wood is tucked away just opposite the station and the vast Lyttleton Playing Fields.

Read more area guides here


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