Haverstock Hill cycle scheme 'poorly thought through', says councillor

The presence and locations of cycle lanes can make a difference to your daily commute

The presence and locations of cycle lanes can make a difference to your daily commute - Credit: PA Archive/Press Association Images

A new cycle lane scheme in Haverstock Hill has been described as "poorly thought through" by opposition councillors.

Work is due to begin this week to provide segregated cycle lanes on Haverstock Hill and Rosslyn Hill between the junction with Prince of Wales Road and Pond Street.

The cycle lanes are part of an 18-month trial to connect the road to Camden's existing network.

Haverstock Hill cycle lanes

Haverstock Hill cycle lanes - Credit: Polly Hancock

People have up until July 27 to say what they think about it before decisions are made to make the scheme permanent.

The scheme is expected to cost £1.2m if approved.

Around £541,000 has been spent, with another £600,000 from Transport for London’s Local Implementation Plan requested at the end of the trial period.

Cllr Oliver Cooper says that residents need to have their say on the Haverstock Hill cycle lanes.

Cllr Oliver Cooper says that residents need to have their say on the Haverstock Hill cycle lanes. - Credit: Oliver Cooper

Cllr Oliver Cooper, leader of the Conservation group, said: "This plan has been so poorly thought through that 69% of local residents and 78% of local businesses opposed it in Camden's own consultation.  It is a disgrace that residents have been ignored by Camden.

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"Haverstock Hill is much steeper than the government's guidance says is appropriate for cycle lanes.  

"As a consequence, it will be used by a lot fewer cyclists and disadvantage a lot more people that need to walk or drive.

"It has been rammed through under Camden's ideological one-size-fits-all approach.

"Steve Adams and I proposed a flatter route on parallel Maitland Park.  It would have had popular support, would have done less harm and offered more benefits to residents and businesses, and would have cost much less to deliver."

Lynn Whiting, chair of the Steele's Village Business Association, supported a scheme along Maitland Park "which would work for everybody".

She said: "We just have to make the best of it and move forward. It is what it is. We did the best we could."

Cllr Adam Harrison, lead member for a sustainable Camden, said the scheme is "absolutely vital for helping people travel more safely" and to tackle pollution.

"I understand this will mean some changes to the area, but I believe residents will find it a real benefit.

"Residents and businesses will have ample opportunity to share their views on this once it has been installed and is in use, ahead of a final decision on whether or not to retain, amend or remove the trial scheme.”