Thousands flock to Highgate Village for the biggest ever Fair in the Square

Thousands of people descended on Highgate’s Pond Square to enjoy a day of food and entertainment at the biggest ever Fair in the Square on Saturday (June 16).

The fair began in 1744 with a pig-throwing contest but has now grown into a red letter day which attracts crowds far beyond Highgate Village’s borders.

Stilt walkers, Morris dancers and Pearly Kings entertained the crowds, who were also treated to a mouth watering hog roast and an abundance of arts and crafts stalls.

Fair in the Square committee member Christina Nolan said: “It was buzzing. People loved the community atmosphere. Meeting neighbours, seeing people they hadn’t seen in a while. It is a lovely tradition for Highgate to rally round.

“I remember going to Fair in the Square when I was pregnant with my son – he is 36 now.


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“In those days we had welly throwing, it was much lower key. But it was the same sort of feeling on the day.”

Proud dog owners entered their prized pooches into the dog show, awarding the coveted title of the dog with the most appealing eyes to Bertie, a Husky-cross.

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Ambrose, a lurcher, and his two-year-old owner Nicholas Read won the best child and dog in fancy dress title.

Queues formed to scramble up the climbing wall, or bounce on the bungee fly and others enjoyed spraying the fire engine hose, which came from Kentish Town Fire Station.

In the Country Fair tent the flower arrangements, cakes, produce and fruit monsters drew admiring glances.

Mick O’Sullivan, of Northwood Road, Highgate, said: “It was fantastic. It has really exploded in the last couple of years.”

Visitors also had the chance to have their photograph taken with the Olympic Torch to raise money for charity at the Alexandra Wylie Tower Foundation stall.

More than 50 local societies and charities took part alongside stallholders selling plants, toys, pottery, jewellery, gifts and clothes.

Artistic children put their own spin on Highgate landmarks in the Cass Art tent, while outside they practiced their juggling skills.

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