There's mortar this wall dispute with George Michael

GEORGE Michael s infamous dance moves have given him no end of success over the years, but it appears thrusting is now causing him a problem. Fans of the star (pictured) need not worry, however, because it is not his pelvis that is giving him jip, just

GEORGE Michael's infamous dance moves have given him no end of success over the years, but it appears "thrusting" is now causing him a problem.

Fans of the star (pictured) need not worry, however, because it is not his pelvis that is giving him jip, just "ground thrusting" in the garden of his Highgate home which has caused 300-year-old boundary walls to crack and crumble.

The singer - real name George Panayiotou - is to spend thousands of pounds repairing the 3.5m high walls, which are struggling to keep his neighbour's raised garden at bay.

But Michael's recent planning application to Camden Council for the wall repairs has revealed the chart-topper's relations with next door might be anything but neighbourly.


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A report into the condition of the walls by surveyors ARH Associates, commissioned by the singer, hints at a territorial battle being waged.

Surveyor Steven Finley says there have been problems in th past, which are "clearly a neighbourly dispute" and recommends action by Michael's solicitor. The report also revealed there could be more conflict ahead as it is uncertain who exactly owns the damaged walls - and who should pay for the repairs.

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The surveyor recommends the walls be registered under the Party Wall Act, which would mean the �20,000-plus cost of the upkeep would be a joint responsibility between the neighbours.

Michael's neighbour this week said he had no knowledge of the planned repair works and Michael was not at home when we called.

But the surveyor's report stresses the need for the repair works to be carried out. It says: "We are of the opinion the walls in the current condition are not in danger of collapse. However the barrelled wall sections have deep brick fractures which would indicate movement of the brick structures, we believe due to ground thrust.

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