Search

Still not fading away after all these years

PUBLISHED: 17:07 18 February 2011 | UPDATED: 17:36 18 February 2011

Gered Mankowitz's Behind the Buttons, showing the Stones on Primrose Hill in 1966

Gered Mankowitz's Behind the Buttons, showing the Stones on Primrose Hill in 1966

PHOTOGRAPH BY GERED MANKOWITZ copyright: BOWSTIR Ltd. 2011/mankowitz.com

PREVIOUSLY unseen photographs of the Rolling Stones posing on Primrose Hill are set to go on show at a Hampstead art gallery, alongside iconic images of the band in the 1960s.

The rare pictures will be exhibited at the Zebra One Gallery in Perrins Court in April and May. They were taken by Gered Mankowitz, who previously snapped Mick Jagger’s old flame Marianne Faithful and toured America with the Stones in 1965.

He worked with the band regularly until 1967 and established himself as one of London’s leading rock photographers.

Mankowitz is also the son of famed screenwriter Wolf Mankovitz, whose film credits include the first James Bond film Dr No.

His work will be shown alongside yet more extraordinary images from the legendary photo session for the Rolling Stone’s Beggars Banquet album taken in 1968.

The pictures of the band in all their glory were taken by photographer Michael Joseph.

The two-day shoot, which included a cat, three dogs, a sheep and a goat, took place at Victorian society painter Frank Owen Salisbury’s former home, Sarum Chase in Hampstead. The Stones were said to have arrived somewhat frazzled after Brian Jones had been busted for drugs the day before.

This was Joseph’s first and last rock n’ roll session but over the years he has shot many legendary figures including Sir Harold Macmillan and Field Marshall Montgomery and went on to become one of Britain’s most successful commercial photographers.

Recalling his short but memorable involvement with the Rolling Stones, Joseph said: “The Stones shoot was extraordinary, wild and hugely memorable. It was the swinging 60s and art director Mike Peters, in the pre-Polaroid era, gave me carte blanche. Having a Kodalith print in my portfolio brought me even more extravagant scenes. At times I had over 80 extras on shoots but luckily never so many animals.

“These large groups began to be known in the trade as a ‘Michael Joseph’ which was compliment indeed.”

o The photographic exhibition will being on April 30 and run until May 14.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Ham&High. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Hampstead Highgate Express