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Rugby star Kenny Logan talks of overcoming dyslexia at Camden centre

PUBLISHED: 11:56 08 November 2011

Kenny Logan talks about his experiences overcoming dyslexia. Picture: Richard Twilton

Kenny Logan talks about his experiences overcoming dyslexia. Picture: Richard Twilton

Richard Twilton

Rugby legend Kenny Logan has spoken about his own journey to overcome dyslexia opening a new learning centre in Camden.

The former Scottish international joined charity Dyslexia Action as it moved to its new centre in the Royal National Institute For The Blind offices in Judd Street, King’s Cross, from old premises in Victoria on Wednesday last week (November 2).

The centre has technology to help young people and adults in Camden and across London with a hidden disability such as dyslexia or literacy difficulties.

The rugby player, who kept his dyslexia secret for years, said: “As someone with dyslexia, I understand first hand the challenges that people with the specific learning difficulty can face.

“I was diagnosed with dyslexia aged 16 and it was a relief to know that there was a reason behind why I struggled with reading and writing.

“Growing up, I would have welcomed support like that Dyslexia Action provides.”

The centre is funded by Capital FM’s Help A Capital Child campaign.

All five of its computers have a new “multi-sensory” technology which helps with reading, spelling and memory.

The centre is also the base for Dyslexia Action’s Catch Up Club, a free after-school club for children aged 12-17, which helps to improve reading and spelling.

Hannah MacLellan, a senior teacher at the centre, is spearheading the club aimed at children in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

She said: “Children and young people who struggle with literacy are at a disadvantage at school and throughout life.

“It is therefore important to provide these learners with help and support so that they are not limited by their reading and spelling ability.”

Anyone who feels their child would benefit from this service should email hmaclellan@dyslexiaaction.org.uk


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