POSTAL STRIKE: We must not allow charities to suffer

THE POST OFFICE has been in disarray and decline for a number of years. This once proud national treasure has been systematically reduced to a shadow of its former self by a management that is plainly less interested in the welfare of its workers and its

THE POST OFFICE has been in disarray and decline for a number of years. This once proud national treasure has been systematically reduced to a shadow of its former self by a management that is plainly less interested in the welfare of its workers and its customers than in cutting costs to the bone - regardless of what this does to the delivery standards of an essential service which many people, businesses and organisations still rely on.

Everything that has happened in the past few years, the cutbacks, the closures, the unreliability and dilution of service, appear to be coming to a head now with the prospect of a national strike which will affect everyone in different ways.

We have chosen to highlight in particular the plight of charities, who rely greatly on the postal service to communicate with patrons and supporters at this, their busiest and most lucrative fundraising period of the year.

They are already feeling the pain, with donations and registrations for events already affected by spasmodic industrial action, with much worse to come if the dispute escalates.


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It seems likely to, as industrial relations are at an all-time low and recent revelations suggest that the Royal Mail would welcome a strike as a way of breaking down existing structures, harking back to the bad old days of Wapping and even the miners' strike.

To help charities at this difficult time, we are setting up an information helpline which will help them to communicate urgent information to the public, both in print and on the internet, at no cost to themselves.

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Our Your Cause helpline will run until the end of the year, hopefully helping to soften the blow of any negative financial impact to local and national charities as a result of further industrial action.

Regardless of the rights and wrongs of this depressing situation, no-one wants people in need to suffer because charities are missing out on vital fundraising opportunities in the vital run-up to and throughout the season of goodwill.

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