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Parking misery sets in over CPZ rules

PUBLISHED: 11:05 06 February 2009 | UPDATED: 15:54 07 September 2010

Charlotte Newton DISGRUNTLED Crouch End residents have accused Haringey Council of condemning them to a life of parking misery after it excluded them from the latest plans. Homeowners in Crescent Road and Coolhurst Road contacted the Broadway this week to

Charlotte Newton

DISGRUNTLED Crouch End residents have accused Haringey Council of condemning them to a life of parking misery after it excluded them from the latest plans.

Homeowners in Crescent Road and Coolhurst Road contacted the Broadway this week to vent their fury over parking restrictions which are being introduced on February 23.

The new parking zones, which are being enforced by Haringey Council, will be introduced around Highgate Tube and in Crouch End - east and west of Crouch Hill.

The changes means residents will need to buy permits to park outside their houses and they should stop commuters parking in the overcrowded streets.

But Tec Fawcett, of Coolhurst Road, claims that the council has ignored his - and his neighbours' pleas - to be included in the parking zone, which will lead to scores of commuters parking there. He is particularly incensed because the council approved an application by people living in Shepherds Close, Highgate, to be excluded from the plans.

Mr Fawcett said: "Residents in streets between Coolhurst Road and the Crouch End Broadway will now be condemned to two years of parking problems because of the deliberate behaviour of the council in ignoring their wishes."

Mr Fawcett claims that he submitted a petition to the council on behalf of residents living in Coolhurst and Crescent Road, within the required timetable, in November which showed that a majority of those responding favoured being included in the Crouch End B controlled parking zone. But the council responded with an automated email and has not provided any explanation as to why their wish was not granted.

Mr Fawcett said: "Cllr Haley's comments (last week) were typically disingenuous. The council took into account the initial views of residents but ignored them when people had time to consider the implications of the proposals in more detail. What is the point of a statutory consultation if the responses are not even replied too, let alone considered?"

But Cllr Brian Haley, cabinet member for environment and conservation, was unapologetic. He told the Broadway: "It beggars belief that these people did not know about displacement after an 18-month consultation period on the CPZ.

"The consequences of displacement from neighbouring roads opting for a CPZ were explained fully to residents and local councillors and they were asked if they would want a CPZ if displacement took place...

"These residents clearly voted against a CPZ after unprecedented levels of consultation with residents and traders. For legal reasons, any extensions to the proposed area would now have to go through another round of statutory consultation. We will take feedback from the scheme when it is implemented in the spring and take things from there. If displacement takes place consultation will follow. The fast track process for implementing a CPZ could be over within a year.


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