Obituary: Nature lover who gave tours along the Parkland Walk was ‘enthusiastic’ about ecology

An “enthusiastic” and “extremely kind” nature lover who gave guided tours through Highgate along the Parkland Walk has died suddenly, aged 66.

Richard Meyers, who retired as an outreach officer at the Gillespie Park and Ecology Centre for Islington Council two years ago, gave walkers a detailed insight into plants and wildlife on the Parkland Walk.

He would also regale ramblers with folklore associated with plant types, telling stories of hobgoblins and mystical creatures.

His widow Ruth Meyers, 63, of North View Road, Hornsey, said: “He loved giving guided walks, that was when he was in his element really. He was a very spiritually-minded person and loved the stories and the mythology behind the plants and would tell the stories to people.”

He developed a nature trail along the walkway, writing booklets on wildlife and plants. His walks ­included bat-watching and a sunrise dawn chorus.

Mr Meyers, who was born in Islington, left school in Sussex at 15 and worked on building sites for many years before becoming a gardener at Alexandra Palace.

When he was made redundant, he was put in charge of conversation area work at Railway Fields for Haringey Council.

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He then became outreach officer at Gillespie Park and Ecology Centre for Islington Council in 1994, working with inter-faith groups in the community to teach them about ecology for 19 years.

When he retired he continued his work with faith groups as a volunteer at the council.

Mrs Meyers, who married Richard in 1979, said: “He was extremely kind and naturally generous.

“He was also a prolific writer but he never got round to publishing anything so we are going to get some of his work together and publish it for him.”

A newsletter sent out to members of the Friends of Parkland Walk paid tribute to him.

He died on October 13 at the Whittington Hospital. His funeral was held at Golders Green Crematorium on October 28.

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