Navy rescue allows dying woman to recieve treatment at UCLH, despite Iceland ash cloud

A DYING woman defied the volcanic ash cloud to fly into a local hospital for life-saving treatment thanks to the Royal Navy. Fife resident Jacqueline Oliver needed treatment at the Heart Hospital – part of the University College London Hospital – hundreds

A DYING woman defied the volcanic ash cloud to fly into a local hospital for life-saving treatment thanks to the Royal Navy.

Fife resident Jacqueline Oliver needed treatment at the Heart Hospital - part of the University College London Hospital - hundreds of miles away after an aortic aneurysm ruptured in her chest in April.

Thankfully Ms Oliver became was rescued by a Sea King helicopter who flew her straight to Regent's Park.

Consultant cardiac surgeon John Yap said: "The ash cloud could have killed her.


You may also want to watch:


"Being able to fly into a centre, which is a world leader in treating this particular condition, saved her life."

Ms Oliver said: "I would have died if they hadn't got me here. It's amazing to think that a volcano in Iceland could have had such an affect.

Most Read

"I can't remember anything and was totally amazed when people told me the story about what had happened. It makes me realise how lucky I am to be alive."

Pilot and duty aircraft captain Lieutenant Al Hinchcliffe said: "We just flew as fast as we could and hoped that we would get her there safely.

"I'm absolutely delighted to hear that she's safe and well and has made a good recovery - it's always nice to hear about a positive result.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter