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MP's damning list of 90 ungritted roads in Haringey

PUBLISHED: 14:38 08 January 2010 | UPDATED: 16:41 07 September 2010

Hornsey & Wood Green MP Lynne Featherstone has published a list of 90 roads in Haringey where residents complained that they were not gritted during the snowfall before Christmas. The list, which was put together after over 200 residents responded to the MP s call f

Hornsey & Wood Green MP Lynne Featherstone has published a list of 90 roads in Haringey where residents complained that they were not gritted during recent snowfall.

The list, which was put together after over 200 residents responded to the MP's call for evidence, shows how widespread dissatisfaction with gritting of local roads has been. The list shows that 26 of the roads reported are categorised by the council as priority one roads, which by the council's own standard are supposed to be gritted first as they are major thoroughfares and bus routes.

The roads named include Alexandra Park Road, Shepherd's Hill which runs from Highgate tube to Crouch End, Cranley Gardens, Crouch Hill and Crouch End Hill, Ferme Park Road, Middle Lane, Mount View Road, Muswell Hill Broadway, Cholmeley Crescent and Cholmeley Park, Onslaw Gardens, Bishopswood Road, Muswell Road and Woodland Gardens.

"It's deeply worrying that so many roads that the Council said would be prioritised were not treated properly after the first heavy snowfall in December. Now that the cold weather is continuing I hope that the Council learns from its mistakes and ensures that these major routes are clear and safe,'' said the Lib Dem MP.

"It's clear that better preparations are needed to protect residents from the major risk of accidents and falls that come with the icy roads and pavements."

Martin Newton, Liberal Democrat transport spokesperson adds:

"Having seen how poorly stocked the grit bins in Muswell Hill and in many other places throughout the borough are, I really worry that residents, especially the elderly and vulnerable, are put at risk every time they leave their homes.

"The pavements are so icy and residents need to have the opportunity to treat the surface themselves if the Council is not doing it for them."

Haringey Council's own description on prioritising roads reads:

Priority 1

Priority 1 roads are the top priority. These are heavily used roads, main roads, roads that have bus routes and roads where risk from snow fall is higher due to steeper gradients of roads.

In the event of snowfall settling the council will dispatch gritting vehicles to spread rock salt on these roads first. Although gritting is usually commenced once snow has started to settle, the council occasionally grits before snow falls if conditions and weather forecasts suggest this is a wise course of action.

Gritting too far in advance of snow fall can be a waste of time as the grit may be thrown to the side of the road by traffic and by the time snow falls there may be none left on the carriageway to be of any use. It is not unusual to grit priority 1 roads more than once during a sustained cold period when snow continues to fall.

Priority 2

Priority 2 roads are second priority. Once the council is satisfied that priority 1 roads are sufficiently well treated and traffic is moving well, priority 2 roads are then gritted. Again it is not unusual to grit priority 2 roads more than once during a sustained cold period when snow continues to fall.

Priority 3

Any road that is not listed in priority 1 or priority 2 is deemed to be priority 3. Because weather conditions are rarely very bad for a very long period of time it is unusual to carry out gritting operations beyond priority 2. However, if the need arises resources will be deployed to do so. Officers will assess local conditions throughout the borough and direct resources to deal with priority 3 locations where gritting is needed the most.


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