Search

Men walk a mile in red stilettos to support Oxfam’s campaign on women in poverty

PUBLISHED: 15:00 07 April 2013

Walk a mile in her shoes: Ghan Chansuwan, Kosta Eleftheriadis, Tomas Triantafilidis, Dillshad Shawki, Steven Perianen, Ben Furtick, Alex Kingshott, James Olav Hill, Samuel Ogunsola and Jack Yakovle, line up outside The Roundhouse. Picture: Polly Hancock

Walk a mile in her shoes: Ghan Chansuwan, Kosta Eleftheriadis, Tomas Triantafilidis, Dillshad Shawki, Steven Perianen, Ben Furtick, Alex Kingshott, James Olav Hill, Samuel Ogunsola and Jack Yakovle, line up outside The Roundhouse. Picture: Polly Hancock

Archant

Nine men dressed in their Sunday for the weekend – wearing women’s high heels as part of the outfit.

Oxfam's Walk A Mile In Her Shoes campaign supports women in poverty worldwide. Picture: Polly HancockOxfam's Walk A Mile In Her Shoes campaign supports women in poverty worldwide. Picture: Polly Hancock

The group walked a mile in stilettos from Chalk Farm to Camden Town on Sunday, March 24 as part of Oxfam’s Get Together campaign, supporting women in poverty around the UK and the world.

Though confident in the cause they support, some of the men had reservations about their unusual footwear.

“I’m nervous about trying to walk in high heels, thought it’s all for a good cause,” said chemical engineering student Samuel Ogunsola, 23, who travelled from his home in Guildford for the event.

The walk is just one in a series hosted by the charity throughout March to fundraise and make a difference for women.

And with nine men and nearly £1,000 raised from Sunday’s walk, event organiser Kathy Keza is optimistic.

“It’s a really fun way of raising money and we’re hoping to raise around £2,000,” she said.

“I hope a lot of people find it interesting and funny, and go to Oxfam’s website to learn more.”

Another walker, Dilshad Shawki, 23, who lives in west London and is a physics student at Imperial College, said that in spite of a dodgy knee, he was looking forward to the challenge.

“If we are going to solve the world’s problems, though it sounds cheesy, we need to start with women,” he said.

“Women are at the centre of everything from work to family.

“I think I wanted to do this walk because it was men doing something about it, and I think it’s important to show that men care about these issues.”

The walk began at Made In Camden restaurant and bar at the Roundhouse in Chalk Farm Road and finished at the Blues Kitchen in Camden High Street.

Steven Perianen, 22, from Croydon, is more pragmatic.

“I feel that from an economic perspective, losing 50 per cent of your creative opportunity can have a very detrimental effect,” said the Deloitte worker.

“I think that making that happen can improve areas greatly.”

When asked what they were most nervous about their challenge, the men seem to be united in fear.

“I’m most nervous about breaking my ankles. I think we all are,” said Mr Perianen.

“I don’t know if you have ever tried it, but it looks to be quite a challenge.”

* Anyone interested in donating can visit Oxfam’s donation page at www.justgiving.com/teams/IWD-Walkamile.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Ham&High. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Hampstead Highgate Express