McKinnon and Symeou cases show injustice of extradition

There is justified national concern about the extradition of the Pentagon hacker Gary McKinnon (pictured, below) under the unjust and non- reciprocal treaty with the USA, agreed by this Labour government. However, the national media is ignoring the equal

There is justified national concern about the extradition of the Pentagon hacker Gary McKinnon (pictured, below) under the unjust and non- reciprocal treaty with the USA, agreed by this Labour government.

However, the national media is ignoring the equally scandalous situation regarding the European Arrest Warrant (EAW). The EAW does not allow prima facie evidence to be considered before granting extradition and leaves British courts effectively powerless to prevent extradition even if they know a grave injustice is being done.

Under the EAW, extradition to any EU member state has become a mere formality irrespective of the evidence or lack of it.

In July, a 20-year-old London man, Andrew Symeou, was sent back to Greece to face a manslaughter charge, the evidence for which would not stand up for five minutes in a British court if it were allowed to be considered, but it was not. He now faces possibly months or years in a Greek jail awaiting trial with no prospect of bail.


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Both these cases show that the British legal system must once again have the power to prevent extradition where the courts decide, on the basis of the evidence presented, that there is not a proper case to answer or that an injustice would be done.

An immediate change in the law is required.

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Gerard Batten

MEP, UK Independence Party

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