Mayors do Dick Whittington walk through Camden

Sofia Mitra-Thakur THE Mayor of Camden joined a chain-gang of ceremonial mayors to commemorate Dick Whittington on a colourful charity walk. The 31 London borough mayors, all dressed in full regalia of mayoral robes and chains, made the annual five-mile

Sofia Mitra-Thakur

THE Mayor of Camden joined a chain-gang of ceremonial mayors to commemorate Dick Whittington on a colourful charity walk.

The 31 London borough mayors, all dressed in full regalia of mayoral robes and chains, made the annual five-mile trek from Highgate Hill to Mansion House.

Camden Mayor Cllr Nurul Islam said: "I really enjoying taking part in this walk and following the historic trail of Dick Whittington.


You may also want to watch:


"I was delighted to be able to carry on such a fine tradition, and it was a great opportunity for me to meet other London mayors and to represent Camden."

This year marked the 36th occasion of the All London Mayors' Charity Walk, which gives the mayors both the opportunity to raise money for charity and catch up on each other's boroughs.

Most Read

City of London Lord Mayor Ian Luder led the councillors in retracing the steps of London's most famous Mayor.

He said: "It is a splendid opportunity to get all the London mayors out of their offices on a Sunday walk for their individual charities."

Setting off from the memorial statue of Dick Whittington and his cat on Sunday April 19, the mayors made a pit stop at Islington Town Hall where they toasted the city's famous son. They were then welcomed into the City by horsemen and bagpipers near Finsbury Circus, and ended the walk in Mansion House, the official residence of the City of London Lord Mayor.

The walk follows the footsteps of Dick Whittington from more than 600 years ago, who according to legend was distinctly underwhelmed by London when he first arrived.

A merchant from Gloucestershire in the late 14th century, he was told the streets of the city were "paved with gold" and came to the capital to seek his fortune, but initially met with little success.

Deciding to return home, he paused on Highgate Hill on his way out of the city and heard the bells of Bow Church ringing.

He believed they said "Turn again, Whittington, thrice lord mayor of London".

He returned to be elected mayor three times in 1397, 1406 and 1419, as well as becoming a wealthy trader who donated much of his profit to the city.

Alderman Ian Luder said: "Whittington really was an excellent role model. Not only did he leave his wealth to charity, he built almshouses, a hospital for single mothers, drinking fountains and even a 64-seat public loo!

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus