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Lord’s £52m redevelopment of cricket stands set to finish by May 2021

PUBLISHED: 16:12 21 September 2020 | UPDATED: 16:13 21 September 2020

Work continues on the the building of both the Compton (left) and Edrich stands which are located at either side of the media centre at Lord's. Picture: Polly Hancock

Work continues on the the building of both the Compton (left) and Edrich stands which are located at either side of the media centre at Lord's. Picture: Polly Hancock

Archant

The £52m redevelopment of Lord’s Cricket Ground is still set to be finished by next May despite the coronavirus pandemic.

From left to right: Architect Sam Wright from Wilkinson Eyre, MCC chief executive Guy Lavender, and MCC assistant secretary of estates and ground redevelopment Robert Ebdon. Picture: Polly HancockFrom left to right: Architect Sam Wright from Wilkinson Eyre, MCC chief executive Guy Lavender, and MCC assistant secretary of estates and ground redevelopment Robert Ebdon. Picture: Polly Hancock

Works started on the construction of the Compton and Edrich stands at the nursery end one year ago that will increase the Home of Cricket’s capacity by 2,600 up to 31,600.

The new three-tiered stands at the St John’s Wood stadium, owned by Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), will include two restaurants and 12 food and drink units.

The next phase of the redevelopment starts this month, including the installation of a canopy roof and an elevated walkway at the back of the stands which gives “impressive” views over the ground.

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MCC’s assistant secretary Robert Ebdon said: “We recognised the world-class design of the new stands at the start of the project back in 2018.

“Seeing them now take shape in front of us at Lord’s reaffirms that when complete, the stands will be truly outstanding.

“They already complement the ground’s character and we are looking forward, when it is safe to do so, to welcome crowds back to Lord’s to experience these exceptional stands for themselves.”

As part of the works, 7,000m³ of material has been excavated from the site to demolish the old stands and 2,000 tonnes of steel has been installed.

The majority of the 11,600 seats fitted have been re-used from the previous stands to reduce waste.

In July, the cricket season resumed following government approval but – similar to other professional sports – without spectators.


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