North Londoners reign strong at annual Pride in the House art prize

Among the highlights of Lauderdale House’s arts programme are the renowned Pride in the House art prize and the hugely popular Annual Photographic Competition.

This year has seen a healthy crop of north London winners in spite of a strong range of entries from across the capital.

In the photo competition, which has run for 29 years and invites entries from professional, recreational and student photographers, Crouch End’s Liz Hart was named winner in the open category.

Last year’s overall winner Gordana Johnson, of Muswell Hill, was runner-up in the heritage section, which was won by Chris Moxey of west London.

The finalists in the Pride in the House prize, first launched in 2002 and open to gay and lesbian artists, were women and children’s rights solicitor Elaine Ginsberg of Highbury, figurative artist and sculptor Peter Faulkner, and Fernando Nonahay and Sholto Williams, both of Upper Holloway.


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Designer Sholto’s evocative images of water lilies saw him named this year’s overall winner and he will go on to hold a solo exhibition later in the year.

In a boost for Lauderdale’s fundraising efforts five pieces of art exhibited at the Pride in the House private view on July 22 were sold on the night, worth about £1,500 and with 25 per cent donated to the Lauderdale Transformed appeal.

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Director Katherine Ives said: “It was one of those wonderful serendipitous moments when you have someone who wants to buy the work, who has money, and who is in the right place at the right time.”

Work from both competitions can be seen at Lauderdale House, Highgate Hill, Waterlow Park, until Sunday (August 3).

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