Camden theatre students inspired by Mary Wollstonecraft’s controversial new statue

Students at La Sainte Union Catholic School with feminist writer and campaigner Bee Rowlatt. Picture: LSU/Sarah O'Keefe

Students at La Sainte Union Catholic School with feminist writer and campaigner Bee Rowlatt. Picture: LSU/Sarah O'Keefe - Credit: Archant

With debate as to the merits of the new statue of Mary Wollstonecraft in Newington Green, students along the road in Dartmouth Park welcomed a Wollstonecraft expert and one of the campaigners behind the statue.

Maggi Hambling's statue in Newington Green, dedicated to Mary Wollstonecraft. Picture: Ioana Marinescu

Maggi Hambling's statue in Newington Green, dedicated to Mary Wollstonecraft. Picture: Ioana Marinescu - Credit: Archant

Feminist writer Bee Rowlatt spent time with a sixth form theatre studies class at La Sainte Union Catholic School, and spoke about why she was proud of the controversial statue produced by sculptor Maggie Hambling.

READ MORE: Covid-19 leaves Garden Suburb school £47k in the redTeacher Sarah O’Keefe explained: “Bee spoke about the statue being for Mary and what she achieved, it is not a sculpture of her, but shows women’s struggles with a strong, determined female form rising out of the top.”

Sarah said her pupils had been so inspired by the discussion that they were set to use Mary Wollstonecraft’s words – “I do not wish women to have power over men, but over themselves” – as the basis for a devised piece of drama.

Maggi Hambling's statue in Newington Green, dedicated to Mary Wollstonecraft. Picture: Ioana Marinescu

Maggi Hambling's statue in Newington Green, dedicated to Mary Wollstonecraft. Picture: Ioana Marinescu - Credit: Archant