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Giving women the vote can only lead to trouble and strife

PUBLISHED: 16:20 28 March 2008 | UPDATED: 14:54 07 September 2010

100 years ago 28 March 1908 The Hampstead Parliament debate women s suffrage. One man said that if women had the vote it would lead to turbulence and strife in the home. Two women appealed for the vote on the basis of justice and equality of humanity. An

100 years ago

28 March 1908

The Hampstead Parliament debate women's suffrage. One man said that if women had the vote it would lead to turbulence and strife in the home. Two women appealed for the vote on the basis of justice and equality of humanity. Another asked if any gentleman would be satisfied if the government of the country were in the hands of women and he had no voice in the making of laws under which he lived. A motion against granting women the vote is passed.

A homeless linen porter charged at Hampstead police court with using indecent and improper language on the Heath is detained in the courtyard while evidence is given inside, as he is ragged and dirty and covered with vermin. The magistrates then go to the courtyard and sentence him to three months' imprisonment as a rogue and a vagabond, hoping that he would come out a better man.

50 years ago

28 March 1958

A day school for 180 mentally sub-normal children is likely to be built by the London County Council in the heart of one of Highgate's most exclusive beauty spots, at the corner of Merton Lane and Fitzroy Park, on the site of Holly Court school.

Highgate has a long history going back to the Ice Age. Where the archway now spans the road which takes its name, deep water covered the ground centuries ago. Lobsters and crabs abounded and sharks swam to and fro seeking what they might devour. When the excavations were being made for the Archway Road, crab and lobster shells and sharks' teeth were discovered. And in 1835 it was announced that there was evidence to confirm a glacial drift at Muswell Hill.

A correspondent writes that many people who live in the country can't seem to understand that a lot of other people live in London from choice. So they feel obliged to invite their suffering friends or relatives living here to spend a weekend in the country. All what, he wonders. Most of these invitations include: "There's not much to do, but at least it's quiet and there's the fresh country air".

25 years ago

25 March 1983

The GLC Labour group meets to decide the fate of the Roundhouse, Chalk Farm - and the likelihood is it will become a Black Arts centre for London. The former Victorian engine shed, an arena for the arts since 1968, is due to close this week.

Cecil the mirror carp was netted in Holland, frozen, transported to Billingsgate and then to Hampstead Community Market. But Cecil was not dead, merely in a state of suspended animation. An assistant placed him on ice in the window, noticed the faint stirring of a gill, and plunged the carp into water. Cecil quickly became an attraction, but expired after two days. He is being kept in water for a while "just in case he's having us on".

10 years ago

27 March 1998

Users of Hampstead Heath call for the resignation of its superintendent, accusing him of defying public opinion and trying to turn the area into a "suburban park". They are furious that days after a public outcry over the resurfacing of Lime Avenue workers went ahead with identical work on another footpath on the other side of the Heath, on Sandy Heath.

o Asthma campaigners threaten legal action against the City of London Corporation over its policy of retaining long grass on Hampstead Heath. Since 1989, staff have been mowing the grass just once a year to provide a wilder, less park-like look, and to encourage wildlife.

Compiled by Anne Rowe

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