Haringey's first three low traffic neighbourhoods get the go-ahead

The decision was made at Transmitter Hall, Alexandra Palace

The decision was made at Transmitter Hall. Alexandra Palace, as the council's "official home" at the Civic Centre in Wood Green is undergoing renovation - Credit: Google

Three low traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs) are set to be launched in Haringey to reduce rat running.

Physical barriers and enforcement cameras will be installed in Bounds Green, Bruce Grove West Green and St Ann’s over the coming months ahead of rollout next year.

The first LTN will be introduced in Bounds Green in early 2022, while measures in Bruce Grove West Green and St Ann’s will go live in spring or summer.

Part of the Haringey Streets for People initiative, LTNs aim to close residential streets to through-traffic, in a bid to tackle air pollution and to encourage residents to walk, cycle and shop locally.

The three schemes were approved at a council's cabinet meeting on Tuesday night (December 7).

They are the first of a possible 25 LTNs outlined in the council’s draft walking and cycling action plan.

According to Haringey Council, these measures will play a key role in helping the local authority achieve its ambition to tackle the climate emergency and create a zero-carbon borough by 2041.

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All homes and businesses will remain accessible by car, van and lorry.

Concerns raised by opponents include increased traffic and air pollution on main roads on the boundaries of the LTNs.

In other boroughs, like Hackney and Islington, the introduction of LTNs last summer sparked protests, with opponents complaining no consultations were held ahead of their implementation. 

But in Haringey the council’s engagement exercise began in February with a survey, before a public consultation was held in August. 

The measures will be implemented under experimental traffic orders to allow residents to give feedback ahead of any decision on whether to make them permanent.

The council's eco chief, Mike Hakata, said: "This is the beginning of a truly transformative journey in which pedestrians, active travel and public transport are prioritised, especially on our neighbourhood roads.

"The low traffic neighbourhoods in our Streets for People programme reclaim local streets for the people living there, making them once more safe, welcoming, and liveable spaces where people meet, chat, socialise and where children play.

“We have learnt from the introduction of low traffic neighbourhoods elsewhere and undertaken a comprehensive engagement exercise, with the ideas and opinions fed into the design of each low traffic neighbourhood."