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Former Haringey mayor quits Labour

PUBLISHED: 13:54 09 July 2009 | UPDATED: 16:17 07 September 2010

Alan Dobbie

Alan Dobbie

THE former mayor of Haringey has rocked the Labour council by defecting to the Tories in a shock move, writes Charlotte Newton. Alan Dobbie, who twice served as mayor because his Labour colleagues voted for him, only stepped down from the role in May. But

THE former mayor of Haringey has rocked the Labour council by defecting to the Tories in a shock move, writes Charlotte Newton.

Alan Dobbie, who twice served as mayor because his Labour colleagues voted for him, only stepped down from the role in May.

But in a dramatic and publicity-seeking move, the Haringey councillor for Noel Park, announced yesterday that he would be defecting to the Tories.

Standing shoulder to shoulder with Eric Pickles MP, the Conservative Party chairman, and Richard Merrin, the Tory candidate for Hornsey and Wood Green, Mr Dobbie said: "For many months now I have felt uncomfortable in being a Labour councillor. But my experience of the Liberal Democrats on Haringey Council over several years has convinced me that they do not offer a real alternative to Labour.

"As a Conservative councillor I will vote against Labour in the council chamber when it is right, not because I am no longer Labour."

Mr Dobbie, pictured, said he had met with Tory activists in Haringey and Mr Merrin.

"I can see that Richard is committed to working for Hornsey and Wood Green and will be the strongest challenger to Lynne Featherstone MP," he said. "I want to be a part of that progressive Conservative alliance which will help the residents of Noel Park and the country that I am not ashamed to say that I love," he said.

Clare Kober, leader of Haringey Council, said: "I'm surprised and disappointed that Alan has chosen to join the Conservative Party - this is a party that has been roundly rejected by the people of Haringey and failed to elect a single councillor in the borough since 1998.

"The Tories continue to be the nasty party who care very little for our public services.


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