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Fight to save heritage buildings is all in vain

PUBLISHED: 06:45 17 March 2006 | UPDATED: 10:25 07 September 2010

TWO heritage buildings will be demolished to make way for the new King s Cross. Argent says removal of the Culross and Northern Stanley buildings is necessary to provide a six-lane north to south thoroughfare – touted as the new Regent Street. But the Kin

TWO heritage buildings will be demolished to make way for the new King's Cross.

Argent says removal of the Culross and Northern Stanley buildings is necessary to provide a six-lane north to south thoroughfare - touted as the new Regent Street.

But the King's Cross Conservation Area Advisory Committee and other local groups say the buildings should be incorporated into the revamp.

The Culross Buildings are on the south side of Battle Bridge Road and run across the development area.

They were built in 1891-92 by the Great Northern Railway to house workers and those who lost their homes in the station expansion.

Vacant since 2001, the buildings are listed in the council's conservation area statement as providing a "positive contribution" to the character of the area.

Judith Martin, of the Industry Buildings Preservation Trust, said: "I think if people could just see through the arches of Culross it would be more tantalising and people would be drawn onto the site."

The Stanley Building North is one of a pair of buildings adjacent to St Pancras Station and the German Gymnasium.

The pair was originally part of a cluster of five. One was destroyed in the Second World War and the other two demolished to make way for a road and the station.

They were designed in 1864/5 by the Industrial Dwellings Company as workers' housing and were considered model homes as they included heat, light and ventilation. They have also been vacant since 2001.

English Heritage supports both demolitions.

Its report says: "We are persuaded that it is acceptable because of the substantial benefits for the community that will flow from the new development."

The landmark gasholders removed five years ago are to be reassembled on the north side. And gasholder 8, which is still standing, is to be moved alongside them.

Speaking against the plans at the council meetings last week, local artist and campaigner Angela Inglis commented: "Gasholder 8 should stay where it is. It is iconic and joins the past with the present.

"Its upper region should remain open giving sky views.

"The lower part could house businesses, shops, galleries, a museum and places where the local community, commuters and workers and visitors could access all types of goods and services. You could put anything in it.

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