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Exclusive: protester Tamsin reports from frontline

PUBLISHED: 13:13 01 April 2009 | UPDATED: 16:03 07 September 2010

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 12:  Student protestor Tamsin Omond takes part in a mass climate demonstration  at Heathrow Airport on January 12, 2009 in London, England. The 'Climate Rush' protest group model themselves on the actions of the Suffragettes who believed in peaceful civil disobedience in order to bring about change. The group belive that climate change is the biggest threat facing humanity today.  (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 12: Student protestor Tamsin Omond takes part in a mass climate demonstration at Heathrow Airport on January 12, 2009 in London, England. The 'Climate Rush' protest group model themselves on the actions of the Suffragettes who believed in peaceful civil disobedience in order to bring about change. The group belive that climate change is the biggest threat facing humanity today. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

2009 Getty Images

Tamsin Omond, 24, an eco-campaigner from West Hampstead, is one of the leading activists behind setting up a climate camp in The City today. She, likes hundreds of others, is calling on the G20 summit to take seriously the issue of climate change. She s

Tamsin Omond, 24, an eco-campaigner from West Hampstead, is one of the leading activists behind setting up a climate camp in The City today.

She, likes hundreds of others, is calling on the G20 summit to take seriously the issue of climate change.

She says world-leaders should form their decisions on the future of the global economy with the looming environmental crisis in mind.

Here she will update a live blog from the campsite that she hopes will remain peaceful and convey a powerful message to the world's governments.

Post one: Preparing for protest

"I've spent a lot of time making lots of bunting for the Climate Camp and others have been making cakes we want to make our stretch of the pavement like a picnic or village fair feel.

It is difficult to know how it is going to go so we are making plans to make plans to make plane.

We want people to arrive and feel they've walked into a beautiful space unrecognisable as The City.

On the [people first] march on Saturday I did see the ugly side of it - about 100 men with shaved heads and big black boots who looked like they'd be quite happy to punch a policeman. I don't know where they come from but I think they emerge for every G20.

"They were surrounded by police and the rest of the 40,000 were peaceful.

"They are not a very big contingent and if there is anything violent we will want it shut down as much as the police.

"I think the police have those people in hand but I think they are using them to try to stop people on the verge of going.

"It is very frustrating that violence and terrorism are being talked about so widely in the media - I think I have a good grasp of everything going on and there is certainly nothing like that.

"I know it is planned to be peaceful and I am hopeful it will stay peaceful.

"I've been baking and sewing and even made some see-through lace balaclavas as a laugh at those who will be really wearing them and looking to cause trouble.

We are hoping 500 people come and stay in the Climate Camp for the night, it is difficult to know how many will come - The City will be overrun with people though. Everyone is arriving at the same time at 12.30pm and we will set up camp.

If 500 of us turn up and do it there will not be much the police can do to stop us.


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