Queen puts Little Venice girl’s portrait on her wall at Buckingham Palace

The Queen is used to seeing images of herself adorn coins, stamps and countless walls but a group of children are hoping to give her something new.

A challenge set by the 18A Arts Academy was met by those children who attend the Harrow Road-based centre with a new look at what the Queen means to young people.

The academy runs after school classes for children aged seven and up in the area, with the aim of helping boost their artistic potential.

Run by artists Gail Astbury and Ariella Giulivi, children were asked to paint a new image of the Queen which would then be created through screen printing methods with one copy hanging in Buckingham Palace.

The winning portrait, designed by 10-year-old Dahlia Giulivi, was chosen by screen printer Samantha Morris who will now teach the children screen printing methods before the artwork gets sent to the Queen’s home at the weekend.


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Ms Astbury said: “It’s the Queen’s year and we wanted the children to get a sense of portraiture so we chose her as she is a great example of one key figure many artists have tried to capture.

“We went to the National Portrait Gallery where there was an exhibition with many different styles.

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“They got a real sense of how portraiture works and they took that away with their own experience and views of the Queen and then they made their portraits.

“We are hoping to broaden the children’s experiences and give them more skills and this was a fun way of doing it.”

The portrait will now hang in the education room of the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace for around eight weeks. The remaining prints will be sold to raise funds for the academy.

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