Dial-a-Ride is a vital service for disadvantaged elderly

The London Assembly recently investigated TfL s Dial-a-Ride service following numerous complaints from people with disabilities and organisations representing those with impaired mobility. The investigation confirmed the views, expressed by Dial-a-Ride

The London Assembly recently investigated TfL's Dial-a-Ride service following numerous complaints from people with disabilities and organisations representing those with impaired mobility.

The investigation confirmed the views, expressed by Dial-a-Ride users, that the service is in drastic need of improvement.

Despite the Assembly's findings, Mayor Boris Johnson has refused to review the Dial-a-Ride service, believing that members should start to see significant improvements now that the new booking system is in place.

According to the Mayor, users can now expect more trips, fewer cancellations, and will find it easy to make trip requests.


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I have long been a supporter of Dial-a-Ride and understand what a lifeline this door-to-door transport is for the Londoners who use it.

I want to ensure that the service is working as well as it possibly could be. I would like to ask any Dial-a-Ride users to let me know how the service is performing and report any failures (and successes) by writing to me at Joanne McCartney AM, City Hall, The Queen's Walk, London SE1 2AA or emailing joanne.mccartney@london.gov.uk

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Joanne McCartney

Assembly Member for Enfield and Haringey

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