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Controversial planning applications thrown out

PUBLISHED: 14:31 27 April 2009 | UPDATED: 16:08 07 September 2010

CAMPAIGNERS are over the moon applications for two highly controversial buildings slammed as monstrosities have been thrown out by Camden Council. The planning department has rejected the application for a luxury seven-storey block in Primrose Hill which

CAMPAIGNERS are over the moon applications for two highly controversial buildings slammed as monstrosities have been thrown out by Camden Council.

The planning department has rejected the application for a luxury seven-storey block in Primrose Hill which protesters said would spoil beautiful views of the park and destroy London's skyline.

They have also refused the linked application by developers Camden Regeneration Ltd for a 13-storey, 72-flat building in Camden Town which would contain the required social housing aspect of the large development.

Chairman of the Friends of Regent's Park and Primrose Hill Malcolm Kafetz said: "We are very pleased with the rejection. It just goes to show that if you tackle these things with the right information the planning advisors do listen and they have chucked it out.

"The idea did not have any wheels anyway. We are not against buildings but we need to protect the skyline and this would have been a nightmare so we are delighted with the decision."

Richard Simpson, chairman of the Primrose Hill conservation area advisory committee, added: "We are delighted. The application should never have been submitted. It is an appallingly misconceived scheme and done in almost complete secrecy. They have wasted everyone's time and I am glad the campaign has paid off."

Developers applied to demolish the empty 10-flat Barrow Hill building on St Edmunds Terrace and replace it with a bigger luxury block with 22 flats and houses, underground parking and fitness and leisure facilities. And at Twyman House on Camden Road they applied to construct the 13-storey block with office, retail and food and drink units.

Architect Peter Clapp is vehemently opposed to the project and said: "I am delighted. They are both monstrous applications and the two cheekiest applications I have ever seen.

"I was bewildered and disappointed by this application for Camden Town. It is hard to believe here that architects that are trained in three-dimensional design can honestly put forward proposals in that way and believe in them. I find it very sad.


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