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79 Fitzjohn’s Avenue: ‘Disruptive’ Hampstead development set to be almost two years late

PUBLISHED: 07:51 10 October 2018 | UPDATED: 07:51 10 October 2018

This is what 79 Fitzjohn's Avenue will look like when the development in the heart of Hampstead is finished. Picture: PegasusLife

This is what 79 Fitzjohn's Avenue will look like when the development in the heart of Hampstead is finished. Picture: PegasusLife

Archant

The 79 Fitzjohn’s Avenue development towers over the centre of historic Hampstead.

PegasusLife's 79 Fitzjohn's Avenue development is still a building site, and likely to be almost two years late. Picture: Sam VolpePegasusLife's 79 Fitzjohn's Avenue development is still a building site, and likely to be almost two years late. Picture: Sam Volpe

However, over a year after its promised completion date, those overlooked by the cranes and scaffolding are still dealing with traffic problems and the disruption that comes with continual construction.

Developers PegasusLife, who are now aiming to finish building the complex of luxury retirement properties in summer 2019 – almost two years late.

Dr Harald Lipman, 86, lives opposite the development on Prince Arthur Road and told the Ham&High: “When they applied for planning permission, they said it would take two years, so it should have been completed by now, instead of causing us problems with the much narrower road and the constant disruptions.

“It’s ironic – they trumpet that they are ‘considerate constructors’ and of course they are in the sense they mean, but they are not when it comes to the time taken.”

This is what 79 Fitzjohn's Avenue will look like when the development in the heart of Hampstead is finished. Picture: PegasusLifeThis is what 79 Fitzjohn's Avenue will look like when the development in the heart of Hampstead is finished. Picture: PegasusLife

Cllr Andrew Parkinson (Con, Frog & Fitz) has taken up the case. He told this newspaper: “Originally residents, and the council, were told it would be completed in September 2017, and once planning permission is granted, the council has no legal power to require a developer to complete within a particular time-frame.

“That means it is important to scrutinise promises made by developers about construction length and practices, so that the full impact of construction on residents is properly taken into account before deciding to grant planning permission.

Toby Conroy, a PegasusLife director, said: “I think we will all be glad when the building work is finished, none more so than our neighbours who have been extremely understanding and patient from the outset.

“Of course, working in such a congested, residential neighbourhood is not without its challenges.

“The demolition itself proved to be quite a task. We had to effectively take it down brick by brick.

“However, by working closely with our neighbours and with Camden Council we have been able to make good progress.”

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