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7/7 BOMBINGS REMEMBERED: Victims will never be forgotten

PUBLISHED: 12:05 10 July 2008 | UPDATED: 15:12 07 September 2010

LONDON - JULY 07: People arrive with flowers at a wreath laying ceremony at King's Cross Station in remembrance of the victims of the 7/7 bombings on July 7, 2008 in London, England. Flowers were laid at King's Cross station by officials and family members to mark the third anniversary of the 7/7 terrorist bombings of 2005.  (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

LONDON - JULY 07: People arrive with flowers at a wreath laying ceremony at King's Cross Station in remembrance of the victims of the 7/7 bombings on July 7, 2008 in London, England. Flowers were laid at King's Cross station by officials and family members to mark the third anniversary of the 7/7 terrorist bombings of 2005. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

2008 Getty Images

By Robyn Rosen SURVIVORS of the July 7 bombings joined families, friends and the community for a memorial service at King s Cross. On Monday, three years to the day when 56 people died and 700 were injured, hundreds gathered at the station where four bomb

By Robyn Rosen

SURVIVORS of the July 7 bombings joined families, friends and the community for a memorial service at King's Cross.

On Monday, three years to the day when 56 people died and 700 were injured, hundreds gathered at the station where four bombers set out to wreak havoc on London.

At 8.50am, the time when the first bombs went off, there was a minute's silence, followed by the laying of flowers.

Camden's mayor Nurul Islam attended the service together with key figures, including London's Mayor Boris Johnson.

Cllr Islam said: "We feel that, as a local authority, we had a moral duty to attend. We felt very sorry for the people who died.

"We left some flowers and a card which said, 'Three years have passed since the tragedies of 7/7 and it is something we will never forget. I leave these flowers as a mark of respect for those who were so needlessly killed and injured.'"

The first three bombs exploded within 50 seconds of each other on the underground at Liverpool Street, Edgware Road and Russell Square. An hour later, a fourth bomb went off on a double decker bus in Tavistock Square.

Mr Johnson placed a card at the King's Cross site, which read: "We honour the memory of those who died on 7/7 2005, we salute the courage of those who were injured and our thoughts and prayers are with all victims and their families."

The anniversary also sparked a new wave of anger from 73 people injured, who are still waiting for compensation.

And some are worried that the government still has not fulfilled pledges to make London safer.

John McDonald, who works in Maida Vale, sat just yards from bomber Mohammad Siddique Khan at Edgware Road.

He said: "I was travelling on the tube this morning and there were no stickers to tell you what to do in case of an accident or emergency. There were no signs around the tube stations about how to evacuate.

"Have they learnt the lessons? I hope we don't have to find out again."

Meanwhile, Muslims in the area been working hard to avoid tension with other communities.

Mohammed Khaliel represents the Regent's Park Mosque on Scotland Yard's Muslim Forum.

He said: "We obviously as a Muslim community had a backlash after the bombings.

"People have had all sorts of things done to them such as verbal abuse, spitting or being punched.

"We try to work hard on initiatives to bridge communities and bring a greater understanding.

"But things happen to make it worse like the Sheikh from the mosque being blinded in an attack last year - that is what we are up against.

"We shout for people to listen. But sometimes the problems are in areas we do not expect and incidents are talked about within the community and go around and then the sentiment becomes more than just London - it is a national sentiment below the surface which can affect things."

editorial@hamhigh.co.uk

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