Can Chemical Wedding be an occult blockbuster?

PUBLISHED: 17:00 11 June 2008 | UPDATED: 15:08 07 September 2010

BY Ben McPartland A KENTISH Town film maker is confident his latest movie will be the blockbuster of the summer. Chemical Wedding is the new occult thriller from former Haverstock schoolboy Julian Doyle. Now based in Oakford Road, Mr Doyle, who made his n

BY Ben McPartland

A KENTISH Town film maker is confident his latest movie will be the blockbuster of the summer.

Chemical Wedding is the new occult thriller from former Haverstock schoolboy Julian Doyle.

Now based in Oakford Road, Mr Doyle, who made his name editing the Monty Python films, says his new venture will put all the summer's big budget movies in the shade.

"Our big problem is that we are up against Indiana Jones and Sex and the City. We can't get any coverage on TV because they are only interested in those blockbusters," he said. "But once the word gets out about the film, they won't stand a chance against us."

The movie is based around the infamous Edwardian mystic, Aleister Crowley.

Crowley was voted 73rd most influential Briton of all time in a BBC poll and was also dubbed the most wicked man of all time.

Mr Doyle is confident audiences will be shocked into liking the movie. "Chemical Wedding is much funnier and disgusting than Sex and the City," he said. "It is absolutely outrageous. It's hysterical and wild. I don't think people know how it is going to develop because it is so wild. A lot of the reviewers got it completely wrong. It's just not what they were expecting."

Mr Doyle himself is not the only local link with Chemical Wedding. Camden Town actor Simon Callow plays the lead role and is ably supported by another ex Haverstock student Jud Charlton, also from Kentish Town.

Lucy Cudden from West Hampstead was also drafted in from drama school to play Lia Robinson.

Doyle wrote the script with Iron Maiden's lead singer Bruce Dickinson when they met while he was directing a pop video for Maiden's hit track, Can I Play With Madness.

He has also turned the script into a novel of the same name which readers can see advertised in the windows of the Owl bookshop on Kentish Town Road.

Mr Doyle is currently weighing up other scripts to turn into films in the future, but he is not expecting to get a call from Hollywood.

"The most fun I have ever had is doing low budget films," he said.

ben.mcpartland@hamhigh.co.uk


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