Zebra One Gallery shows rare Terry O’Neill images of Bowie and Bardot

PUBLISHED: 12:26 02 September 2020 | UPDATED: 12:26 02 September 2020

Singer David Bowie shares a cigarette with actress Elizabeth Taylor in Beverly Hills, 1975. It was the first occasion that the pair had met.

Singer David Bowie shares a cigarette with actress Elizabeth Taylor in Beverly Hills, 1975. It was the first occasion that the pair had met.

© Iconic Images Limited

The Hampstead gallery is staging a retrospective of the late photographer which includes iconic shots of actors and musicians from Elton John to Faye Dunaway

Paul Newman and Lee MarvinPaul Newman and Lee Marvin

Rare and previously unseen images of icons including David Bowie and Brigitte Bardot by iconic photographer Terry O’Neill are on display in Hampstead’s Zebra One Gallery.

The late photographer’s retrospective also includes images of Elton John, Raquel Welch, and contact sheets from his famous Bardot and Faye Dunaway shoots.

O’Neill’s archive of two million negatives has been revisited over the past five years unearthing some of the 20th century’s most evocative celebrity moments.

Thirteen signed images are included in the exhibition which runs at the Hampstead gallery from September 15 - 29 September.

Singer Roger Daltrey in the countryside with his dogs on his estate in Sussex, 1978.Singer Roger Daltrey in the countryside with his dogs on his estate in Sussex, 1978.

O’Neill, who died last year, co-signed the contact sheet of a now legendary 1974 David Bowie shoot in Los Angeles to promote his Diamond Dogs tour.

It shows the singer smoking in a yellow suit - the initials DB in Chinagraph indicate Bowie’s favourite shot.

It was later gifted by O’Neill who described Bowie as his “creative muse” and captured his shapeshifting evolution from Ziggy Stardust to the Thin White Duke and beyond.

Out-takes from his then girlfriend Faye Dunaway’s moment of success in 1977 show her lounging next to the Beverly Hills Hotel’s swimming pool at dawn with the Oscar statuette she had just won for Network.

French actress Brigitte Bardot on the set of 'Les Petroleuses' a.k.a. 'The Legend of Frenchie King', directed by Christian-Jaque in Spain, 1971.French actress Brigitte Bardot on the set of 'Les Petroleuses' a.k.a. 'The Legend of Frenchie King', directed by Christian-Jaque in Spain, 1971.

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Other out-takes include Bardot smoking a cigar with the wind blowing through her hair and a 1975 shot of Elizabeth Taylor and Bowie in Los Angeles.

Taylor was desperate to meet Bowie, so asked O’Neill - who knew everybody - to bring him to lunch because she wanted him to star in her next film.

He was four hours late, leaving the Hollywood superstar fuming. But, thanks to her love for O’Neill, she agreed to appear in some sultry shots with the rockstar.

American actress Faye Dunaway takes breakfast by the pool with the day's newspapers at the Beverley Hills Hotel, 29th March 1977. She seems less than elated with her success at the previous night's Academy Awards ceremony, where she won the 1976 Oscar for Best Actress in a Leading Role for 'Network'.American actress Faye Dunaway takes breakfast by the pool with the day's newspapers at the Beverley Hills Hotel, 29th March 1977. She seems less than elated with her success at the previous night's Academy Awards ceremony, where she won the 1976 Oscar for Best Actress in a Leading Role for 'Network'.

He did not get the part in the movie and the session remained buried until rediscovered by O’Neill 40 years later. Press shots from the 1971 comedy Pocket Money starring Paul Newman and Lee Marvin were a struggle because Marvin was mostly indisposed due to alcohol during filming and refused to come out of his trailer.

But he made an exception for O’Neill who persuaded Marvin - a much larger man than

Newman - to bend slightly at the knee, and encouraged Newman to stretch up so they both appeared the same size.

Other stars in the exhibition include: The Beatles with Laurence Olivier, Marlene Dietrich, Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland and Liza Minelli, Robert Redford and Richard Helms and Roger Daltrey with his dogs on his Sussex estate.

Born in Romford in 1938, O’Neill documented the most influential film music and political faces over six decades, forging lasting relationships with many celebrities. He captured The Beatles and The Rolling Stones at the beginning of their careers, was the only photographer to photograph every actor to play James Bond, and every British Prime Minister from Winston Churchill to Gordon Brown.

Terry O’Neill The Vintage Collection runs September 15-29 at Zebra One Gallery in Perrin’s Court Hampstead.

zebraonegallery.com


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