Artists explore their personal melancholia and creativity at The Freud Museum

PUBLISHED: 09:38 30 October 2020 | UPDATED: 09:38 30 October 2020

Black Sun by Kasia Depta-Garapich is part of the Melancholia exhibition at The Freud Museum

Black Sun by Kasia Depta-Garapich is part of the Melancholia exhibition at The Freud Museum

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Delayed exhibition at Freud’s former home sees six student artists respond to the theme of their personal journey through the melancholic state

Absence of Mind by Qingyu Cherry Song is part of the Melancholia exhibition at The Freud MuseumAbsence of Mind by Qingyu Cherry Song is part of the Melancholia exhibition at The Freud Museum

An artistic exploration of melancholia is the first new exhibition to open at The Freud Museum since lockdown.

Commissioned by UCL’s Psychoanalysis Unit, the artworks by six students from The Slade and University of the Arts London were due to go up in spring before the pandemic forced the Belsize Park museum to close its doors.

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Now installed in the former home of the father of psychoanalysis, it explores the significance of melancholia in creativity and psychoanalysis. Each artist presents their highly personal journey through the melancholic state and how a form of loss can transform into creativity.

The theme inspired diverse works from Kasia Depta-Garapich’s interactive mirror installation Black Sun, to Holly Hewitt’s brass sculpture Loss of Innocence, to Cherry Song’s evolving display of crystals titled Absence of Mind.

Freud Museum director Carol Seigel said: “Running a museum during lockdown has presented innumerable challenges - financial, curatorial and emotional. It is wonderful to be able to welcome visitors again and we are trying to make the Museum welcoming as well as Covid safe. Being able to install the postponed Melancholia exhibition feels very special, and a sign of life slowly returning to normal. The artists’ works are moving and thought-provoking, particularly in the unique atmosphere of Sigmund Freud’s last home.”

Liz Allison, Director of the UCL Psychoanalysis Unit adds: “The exhibition was conceived before we had any idea of what would befall us in 2020, but the artworks have taken on additional resonance in the context of the losses we have all endured, and serve as a timely reminder of the essential role that art can play in helping us to work through our most challenging experiences.”

Melancholia runs until November 15. Tickets must be booked in advance www.freud.org.uk


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