Amy Winehouse remembered through street art in Camden’s Jewish Museum

PUBLISHED: 11:00 13 March 2017

Untitled by Pegasus

Untitled by Pegasus

Archant

The exhibition, which shows the talented woman behind the often lurid headlines, debuted in 2013 and after touring worldwide returns to the Albert Street museum this month due to public demand

A new street art trail and specially commissioned installation will mark the return of the Jewish Museum’s Amy Winehouse exhibition to Camden Town. Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait features a highly personal collection of clothes, photographs, instruments and memorabilia of the late singer curated by her brother Alex and sister-in-law Riva.

The exhibition, which shows the talented woman behind the often lurid headlines, debuted in 2013 and after touring worldwide returns to the Albert Street museum this month due to public demand.

Titled Love is a Losing Game, street artist Pegasus’ large sale multi coloured panels of Amy with a paintbrush surrounded by her graffitied lyrics will greet visitors on arrival.

They can also pick up a map and follow a trail of Amy-themed street art around Camden Town including stop offs at the Earl of Camden pub, Nemesis tattoo parlour and an alleyway between Miller Street and Camden High Street.

Head of exhibitions Jo Rosenthal said the permissions allowing artists such as Captain Kris, Mr Cenz, and Philth to paint on various walls were secured by their partner Global Street Art.

“We wanted to celebrate the return of the exhibiton and add another layer of content, so we commissioned a trail through the streets of Amy’s beloved neighbourhood,” she said.

“Global Street Art who advocate a painted world, negotiated the locations. We’ve given the artists a lot of freedom so there’s an element of surprise even for us. Amy was a free spirit and what comes across in the exhibition is how important a sense of place were to her; London and particularly Camden Town. We hope that energy comes through in this trail, which ends at the museum with Pegasus’ vibrant installation.”

The artist said: “Amy’s music and words got me through some of the hardest moments in my life. I wanted to create a beautiful image which shows her feeling hopeful for that one true love. By repainting the image four times I invoke a different feeling by each colour change.”

The exhibition explores the troubled singer’s home life, family history, musical influences and career leading up to her premature death in 2011.

Rosenthal said family artefacts highlighting the influence of Amy’s grandmother Cynthia who grew up in the East End helped “break down the cliches of Amy’s image” that were prevalent in the media.

“The exhibition gives a more complete, truthful portrait of who she was and how she was shaped by her family and her Jewish heritage. But it also celebrates her tremendous talent, vocally and lyrically.”

Museum director, Abigail Morris, said: “Aside from being an immensely talented, iconic singer, Amy was also a Jewish girl from North London. It is fitting that the Jewish Museum in her beloved Camden Town should tell her story.”

The street art trail runs March 15 until June 4 and the exhibition runs until September 24. jewishmuseum.org.uk


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