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Dreams come true for A-level students

PUBLISHED: 16:25 22 August 2008 | UPDATED: 15:20 07 September 2010

MANY students dreams came true with the arrival of the long-awaited A-level results. Outstanding achievers include Svetlana Grishina from the Hampstead College of Fine Arts. She arrived from Kiev to study at the college in 2005, took her GCSEs as a one-

MANY students' dreams came true with the arrival of the long-awaited A-level results.

Outstanding achievers include Svetlana Grishina from the Hampstead College of Fine Arts.

She arrived from Kiev to study at the college in 2005, took her GCSEs as a one-year course and passed them all with a special commendation in art.

She passed five A-levels this year achieving A grades in fine art, history of art, photography, and Russian and a C in classical civilisation, and will now read fine art at the Ruskin school of drawing and fine art at Oxford University.

And from La Swap sixth form, 18-year-old Chloe Garnett managed to grab a place at the Royal Veterinary College in Camden Town by gaining two As and B in biology, chemistry and physics.

Her headteacher at La Sainte Union, Maureen Williams, said: "It really is a great achievement for Chloe because it is rare for a student who doesn't live on a farm or come from that type of background to get in to do veterinary science."

Six Year 13 pupils from Camden School for Girls were selected to go to a Zulu village in South Africa where they were involved in community projects.

One of those was star student Suzanna Hudson Cooke, who found her calling when she saw two lions mating in the wild.

She was over the moon after getting three A grades and is now due to train as a vet at the Royal Veterinary College in Camden Town.

"I'm so pleased and excited," she said. "I'm going to be a vet - but not for cats and dogs - I'm going to work with wild animals."

Mac Chapwell, another of La Swap's A-level students, outdid his own expectations by achieving straight As in history, English and politics.

Mac, who is off to study politics at Queen's University in Belfast, said: "I thought something was wrong when I first looked at the results. I couldn't take it in.

"I was not meant to get three As. At the start of the year I was expecting to get Cs so I worked around the clock.

"There is no way these exams are getting easier. I have never had a harder test in my life. This was the hardest thing I have ever had to do. But the teaching has been exceptional.


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