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For Sale: Charles Dickens’ Fitzrovia home, which inspired Oliver Twist

PUBLISHED: 17:33 11 November 2014 | UPDATED: 14:59 13 November 2014

Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia W1T. The second floor flat in this building where Dickens spent parts of his childhood is on the market for £760,000

Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia W1T. The second floor flat in this building where Dickens spent parts of his childhood is on the market for £760,000

Krystian Dziekanski

Brand new to the market is this one bedroom Fitzrovia flat on the second floor of a building where Charles Dickens lived for two stretches of his childhood.

Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia W1T. The second floor flat in this building where Dickens spent parts of his childhood is on the market for £760,000Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia W1T. The second floor flat in this building where Dickens spent parts of his childhood is on the market for £760,000


 The house, on what is now Cleveland Street, was situated close to the Cleveland Street Workhouse, which is believed to be the inspiration behind Oliver Twist.



  


Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia W1T. The second floor flat in this building where Dickens spent parts of his childhood is on the market for £760,000Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia W1T. The second floor flat in this building where Dickens spent parts of his childhood is on the market for £760,000


  



  


The living room, with Georgian fireplaceThe living room, with Georgian fireplace


  



 As Laurence Glynne of LDG, who are joint managing the property with Coopers and RIB, says: “It’s fascinating to think what Dickens would have made of the Fitzroy Place development across the road, where flats are being sold off-plan for £2,000 per square foot.”


The bedroomThe bedroom


 The property benefits from an original Georgian fireplace in the main room begging the question of whether the infant Dickens might have had his socks dried before that very fire.



  


The kitchenThe kitchen


  



  



  



 There are modern wood floors and double-glazed sash windows throughout the flat and rooms are fairly generously proportioned.



 The building was Dickens’ first London residence after his family moved to the city from Portsmouth and he lived there between 1815, when he was three, and 1817, and again from 1829 until 1832.



 He went on to spend much of his life living in different parts of what is now the borough of Camden, but many of the original streets and buildings no longer exist.







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