Search

Pete Doherty supports Camden food charity with Babyshambles gig at the Roundhouse

13:40 12 March 2014

Pete Doherty performed with his band Babyshambles at the Roundhouse on Monday. Picture: PA Archive/Andrew Milligan

Pete Doherty performed with his band Babyshambles at the Roundhouse on Monday. Picture: PA Archive/Andrew Milligan

PA Archive/Press Association Images

Rock and roll band Babyshambles have helped to raise much-needed cash for a Camden charity with a special show at the Roundhouse.

The four-piece, fronted by singer-songwriter Pete Doherty, played to a sell-out crowd in support of charity Food For All at the Chalk Farm venue on Monday night.

Mr Doherty, best known musically as the co-frontman of influential band The Libertines who split in 2006, is a Food For All patron and pledged to donate a cut of ticket sales from Monday’s gig to the charity.

Food for All, founded by Hare Krishna monk Peter O’Grady in 1999, collects tonnes of wasted food from supermarkets to provide meals to Camden’s homeless and needy six days a week.

Mr O’Grady, 50, who lives in King’s Cross, said: “Every week we divert 10 tonnes of good food from going into landfill and re-distribute it into the community.

“There’s a lot of families that are struggling to make ends meet and a lot of poor students. They come with their lunchboxes and we fill them up.

“There are a lot of people who for various reasons are struggling to make ends meet.”

On Monday, Babyshambles were introduced to the stage by Jennie Matthias, former lead singer of eighties all-girl band The Belle Stars.

Last June, Mr Doherty opened charity shop Matchless Gifts, in Caledonian Road, King’s Cross, which is managed by Ms Matthias and helps to fund the work of Food For All.

It also hosts yoga classes, cooking courses and drug counselling sessions.

The charity shop was originally a day centre for homeless people but the centre was forced to close when council funding was lost.

Mr O’Grady said his charity was now struggling to make ends meet and hoped other prominent musicians would follow Mr Doherty’s lead.

“We really appreciate it, Pete is helping us big time,” he said. “We hope that other bands will follow him because we are struggling financially.

“Pete donates food to homeless people. He’s quite a concerned guy. He’s a very good-hearted person, he’s up for helping.”

Food for All’s van distributes meals to the homeless from Monday to Saturday at noon in Kentish Town, in Camden Town at 1pm and in King’s Cross at 2.15pm.

To find out more about the charity, visit www.foodforall.org.uk. If you wish to donate to Food For All, pop into Matchless Gifts.

0 comments

Latest News Stories

11:40
Members of the Kentish Cluster group outside Number 10 Downing Street

A new business group hoping to make Kentish Town a hub for London’s startups stressed the importance of “immigration and education” to the prime minister’s business advisor, during a visit to Number 10 Downing Street.

Jasmine (centre, left) and Melissa Hemsley (centre, right) with pupils at Parliament Hill School. Picture: Nigel Sutton.

Pupils at a Camden girls school were given a masterclass in healthy eating by two rising cookery stars as part of a charity initiative in memory of a Highgate schoolgirl.

10:14
Ruby Wax will be performing at the JW3. Picture: Nigel Sutton

The Primrose Hill Christmas Festival, the first ever UK Jewish Comedy Festival and a talk with playwright Mike Bartlett are just some of the things featured in our top five this week.

12:45
Left to right: Organiser Saba Khan with student Seamus Furey and his mum Annamarie Clancy. Picture: Polly Hancock.

Pupils at a Swiss Cottage special school became sales assistants for an evening during a charity fashion sale.

Most read news

The new legislation is being backed up by an anti-terrorism awareness drive by police forces nationwide.

More than 170,000 tweets have been posted in the last three days using the hashtag #CameronMustGo.

Computer firm Symantec discover malware so sophisticated, they say it suggests government involvement.

The tragic police shooting of a boy in Cleveland prompts state legislators in Ohio to consider new laws for replica guns.

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Hampstead & Highgate Express e-edition today E-edition