Search

D-Day veterans describe ‘awe-inspiring’ scenes of Normandy landings during 70th anniversary

07:00 12 June 2014

D-Day veterans Walter Schneiderman, 91, Colin Anson, 92, Alice Anson, 89, and Bill Howard, 94, outside the London Jewish Cultural Centre. Picture: Polly Hancock

D-Day veterans Walter Schneiderman, 91, Colin Anson, 92, Alice Anson, 89, and Bill Howard, 94, outside the London Jewish Cultural Centre. Picture: Polly Hancock

Archant

On June 6, 1944, RAF pilots flying over the English Channel described seeing the sea so packed full of ships “one could have walked from shore to shore”.

Bill Howard (centre) with his fellow naval officersBill Howard (centre) with his fellow naval officers

The Normandy landings, or D-Day, became the largest seaborne invasion in history, involving more than 7,700 ships, 12,000 aircraft and 156,000 troops.

On Friday, veterans in Hampstead and Highgate remembered their own contributions to the momentous day some 70 years later.

Their efforts saved countless lives and were said to have significantly cut the length of the Second World War.

Bill Howard, 94, was one of 10,000 men and women from Germany and Austria who fought in British uniform.

A Jew persecuted while living in Berlin, he managed to leave his native Germany by train in 1937 and begin a new life in West Hampstead.

Volunteering as a Royal Navy intelligence officer intercepting German communications, he remembers the “astonishing” scenes when he arrived in Portsmouth a few days before the invasion.

“When you’re faced with what you could see before D-Day – well, there’s nothing quite like it. There were so many ships it was unbelievable.”

He added: “I was stationed on the HMS Bellona – a brand new light-cruiser only entering service the year before – which was supporting the Americans landing at Omaha Beach.

“Our guns started opening fire in the early hours of the morning and carried on for hours. The noise was unbelievable.

“I watched as the troops landed on the beach. It was awe-inspiring. These boys were the real heroes.

“I was tasked with listening in to German communications and given the codes I assume had been broken by the Enigma lot – they had done amazing work.

“You could tell the Germans were in a real panic – all shouting their heads off at each other, giving away their positions and what they were planning.”

Mr Howard joined Walter Schneiderman, 91, Colin Anson, 92, and Alice Anson, 89, to talk about their experiences of D-Day at the London Jewish Cultural Centre (LJCC) in Golders Green yesterday (Wednesday).

Historian Anthony Beevor joined dignitaries on the beaches of Normandy on Friday to pay his respects to the fallen and guide Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge through what the troops would have faced. More than 4,400 Allied troops died on D-Day.

Speaking to an audience at the LJCC just days before, he said: “The preparations were staggering and made past war efforts look insignificant.

“It was so big, Operation Overlord became known as Operation Overboard – a joke made by troops to hide what became known as D-Day jitters.

“There were several turning points in the war but I would say D-Day could be described as being a turning point in the Cold War.

“Hitler would have still been defeated without it but it begs the question of how far the Red Army would have advanced by that time. It affected the post-war outcome massively.”

Latest Hampstead & Highgate News Stories

40 minutes ago

Former children’s laureate and author Michael Rosen has condemned Haringey Council’s plans to move thousands of council houses into a private company as “social and ethnic cleansing”.

55 minutes ago

Campaigners against funding cuts to schools in Haringey have called on parents to turn the tide.

13:07

A Camden School for Girls student has seen her rejection letter from Oxford University go viral after transforming into a work of art.

Yesterday, 13:55

A car wash owner has been jailed after an employee was electrocuted while showering in squalid rat-infested housing he provided for workers.

Yesterday, 13:07

Criminal gangs working across Hampstead are ordering spare keys online using numbers etched onto the access locks.

Yesterday, 11:50

Testing along West End Lane showed many residents were being exposed to nitrogen dioxide levels more than 50 per cent above permitted levels.

Yesterday, 11:02

The charity gathered in front of the Iranian Embassy as husband Richard delivered a letter calling for justice and a better future for his child

Yesterday, 10:00

Transport for London (TfL) plans to provide up to 70 new homes by building above a proposed new entrance on Buck Street.

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Most read Hampstead & Highgate news

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Property Newsletter Sign-up

Get the latest North London property news and features straight to your inbox with our regular newsletter

I am also happy to receive other emails...
Fields marked with a * are mandatory
Email Marketing by e-shot

Competitions

Having a brand new kitchen is something that lots of people want but can only dream of. Sadly keeping up to date and making our living spaces as nice as they can be is a costly and incredibly stressful business. Even a fresh coat of paint makes all the difference but isn’t easy or quick.

Who wouldn’t love the chance to go on a shopping spree. Imagine being able to walk into a shop and choose whatever your heart desires without having to worry about how much it costs.

Digital Edition

cover

Enjoy the
Hampstead & Highgate Express
e-edition today

Subscribe

Education and Training

cover

Read the
Education and Training
e-edition today

Read Now