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Former West Hampstead marketing manager Victoria Slotover describes how her pipe dream of becoming a writer became a reality

Bridget Galton hears about an exhibition where the artworks are steeped in the spice

Mikel Murfi’s wondrous one-man show, fittingly performed on the bare, makeshift stage of the Tricycle’s cinema is the sequel to his much-loved The Man in the Woman’s Shoes

A musical about an Evangelical American TV channel hitting the shores of sexually repressed Blighty should appeal

Bridget Galton talks to ‘first lady of radio’ about her ‘important’ history of Britain’s top women

Bridget Galton talks to Brendan Gleeson about playing a role inspired by a squatter on the Heath

Diane Keaton and Brendan Gleeson give admirable performances in this Hampstead based romcom, but nothing is seen through and the dialogue is weak

Bridget Galton talks to Jackson’s Lane’s artistic director Adrian Berry about his annual Postcards Festival of contemporary circus and cabaret where audiences need only pay what they can afford

Juliet Stevenson says her fears about playing Hamlet’s mother were allayed by Robert Icke’s rich and passionate production

Around ten thousand revellers descended on Highgate’s Pond Square to enjoy a tropical-themed day of food and entertainment at Fair in the Square on Saturday.

Bridget Galton talks to Kevin Macdonald about his iconic movie ahead of Touching The Void Live at Barbican Hall

You can count on few fingers the number of bands who’d be able to make you cry using the words “on the rail replacement bus”.

Bridget Galton talks to the son of Martin Aitchison who illustrated 80 original Ladybird books and Jason Hazeley who uses the old images in updated spoofs

It’s taken two years for Nikolai Foster’s production of Annie to transfer from Leicester’s Curve to the West End. It’s a pity it wasn’t sooner.

Newly commissioned song cycle is based on heart-breaking letters from a Nazi camp inmate to the grandson she would never meet

Despite its ambition and having plenty of potential resonance, Common is dense and wilfully bewildering with little space for development

Former banker Emma Loizides’ solo show is titled Journeys but could just as well be called ‘Home and Away’.

A community choir is celebrating after they were selected to perform in a national event honouring the work of volunteers.

Rylance and fellow actor Kika Markham will perform dramatic readings from texts which question embedded notions about war, and offer a fresh take on history that might point an end to the conflicts of today.

David Studwell has sold his nostalgic works celebrating the glamour and dark side of fame to Kate Moss and George Michael’s cousin

Bridget Galton samples a hotel’s drive to get guests sampling London culture with a trip to see Bernstein’s jazzy Broadway musical in Regent’s Park’s famous open air theatre

At its heart is an examination of how people embrace competitive outrage and offence, seeming to go out of their way to pose as holier than though and just that bit more PC than the next person.

Zoe Paskett visits the Barbican’s new sci-fi exhibition, which extends throughout the building covering film, tv, literature, art and music

Roger Michell’s adaptation of this Daphne Du Maurier novel features a Sphinx like Rachel Weisz as a possible murderer but the pace is too stately to create suspense

Drill down into Britishness and what do you find? Is it from institutions like the BBC, the NHS or the OU? Or are we British because of common schooling experience and a love of Shakespeare? asks Hornsey author Martin Upham

As Pride Month begins, Zoe Paskett visits a new free exhibition that marks the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality

Zoe Paskett talks to the Luminary Bakery founder Alice Boyle and Benjamina Ebuehi from Great British Bake Off about empowerment through baking

A new exhibition of the photographs of celebrated photojournalist Terence Spence opens at Proud Camden

It isn’t any kind of landmark and perhaps it is judged too kindly just because it isn’t monstrously disappointing like the previous DC films

Greg Wetherall talks to Hampstead comic David Baddiel about truth and vulnerability

We realised we could think of several well-known male writing friendships: Coleridge and Wordsworth for instance, or Byron and Shelley, Fitzgerald and Hemingway. But when it came to the most celebrated female authors, we found ourselves at more of a loss.

John Boyega stars in Jack Thorne’s version of Georg Büchner’s play about a young soldier driven to madness and murder, but a clichéd script does a disservice to issues surrounding veteran mental health

The daughter of a Holocaust survivor hopes to realise her mother’s dying ambition to become a famous artist.

The film of one of the world’s favourite TV shows is disappointing, with flimsy humour and a meanness of spirit that leaves a foul taste in the mouth

Meredith Taylor founder and editor of online film magazine Filmuforia rounds up the latest from the 70th Cannes Film Festival

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